About North Georgia
60 Hikes within 60 Miles Atlanta
More from About North Georgia on Facebook (no account required)






Search
Adventure
Attractions
Biographies
Books
Businesses
Cherokee
Christmas
Civil War
Counties
Creek
Events
Facts
Features
Food
Giving Back
Helen
History
Indians
Letters
Lodging
Moundbuilders
Mountains
Naturally
Notes
Parks
Past Issues
Photography
Poetry
Railroads
Revolution
Rivers
Roads
Stops
Tenn
Travel
Voices
Weather
Website

Trail of Tears Genocide
About North Georgia

Hello. My name is Brooke in 9th grade from Cherry Hill High School East. In World Civilizations Honors we were assigned to do a project on genocide, specifically the Cherokee Trail of Tears. I was wondering if you had any more specific info. on the genocide part and the steps that led to it. Any extra information would be of help. Thank you very much!

Brooke

Brooke

Accepting the definition of genocide as planned extermination of an entire national, racial, political, or ethnic group, I do not believe that I have ever read, nor do I personally believe, that the intent of the American people as a whole in 1830 was to murder all the Cherokee. A two vote shift in the U. S. Senate could have prevented the legal removal of the Cherokee.

The driving force behind this outrage was greed, and not the greed for gold, as many people are misled to think. It was Georgia's greed for land that forced the Cherokee from their "Enchanted Land." Individual Americans, some with significant power, did want to end the Cherokee existence in America, however, it would be unfair to Americans as a whole to classify them as genocidal.

So if they were not genocidal, then what were they? Clearly, Americans believed that they were better than the Cherokee. This makes them, by definition, bigots. Most were probably racists. Even the northern whites, who tended to be more sympathetic to the plight of the Cherokee did not generally perceive the Cherokee to be their equals. As an example, when Elias Boudinot and John Ridge married white women the town in Connecticut where they went to school forced the college to close.

I would strongly recommend John Ehle's The Trail of Tears as an excellent resource on the subject. If you are looking for something quicker, try David Williams The Georgia Gold Rush, but I suspect that it will be hard to find a copy in Cherry Hill. He devotes two chapters to the removal, and it is the best concise telling of the events that occurred leading up to the travesty the Cherokee called "Nunna daul Tsuny"


Letters

About North Georgia
About North Georgia Index
Tools
Add link from your web site to Trail of Tears Genocide

 

Georgia Imix icon

| More
All of the photographs, graphics and text on About North Georgia (http://www.aboutnorthgeorgia.com) are © Copyright 1994-2017 by Golden Ink unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. For more information please see our Copyright policy


[About North Georgia] [History] [Travel] [Adventure]
[American Indians] [Biography] [Parks ] [Attractions ] [Naturally] [Weather] [Railroads] [Rivers]
[Mountains] [Roads] [Feature Articles] [Previous Issues] [Facts] [Food]
[Giving Back] [Voices from the Past] [Poetry Corner] [Photography]
[Lodging] [About Us] [Bookstore ] [Events ] [Events by month ] [Letters ] [Help ] [Kudos ] [Randy's Corner]
Other Places: Today in Georgia History : Today in The Civil War : Georgia Attractions : Georgia Hiking : Chattanooga



Golden Ink Internet Solutions
Georgia's innovative design group

Legal Notice
Copyright Policy
Privacy Policy