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Thank you for making Cherokee history meaningful.
About North Georgia

Thank you. The detail you provide in your history and biographies of the Cherokee is perhaps to some, trivia. Not so to me. I am a Cherokee who was born and raised on the East Coast, but who connected with the Cherokee Nation out in Tahlequah, Oklahoma, when I relocated there to begin my legal career as a staff attorney for the tribe. When I read your pages, there was so much I recognized, but had never before known the significance of.

My experience is primarily post-removal. It was fascinating to me to learn that the Indian Agent for the N. Georgia area was named Return J. Miegs. The spelling is too unique, too unmistakable. There is a Miegs Jewelry store in Tahlequah, Oklahoma, formerly owned by a David Miegs who sold the store a few years ago after his parents passed away, and invested in a smaller, more personal jewelry shop a few blocks away. I have been in both stores at least a hundred times.

And Samuel Worcester, the missionary who made the second case of the now famous "Marshall Trilogy" possible, the cases that were the beginnings of Indian law as a distinct body of American Jurisprudence and that eventually led to the only Constitutional Crisis ever faced by the United States - you mention that he died in Park Hill. Well I know that place! It's not twenty minutes from where I lived. I have driven through it many times on my way to Lake Tenkiller. More fascinating still was to learn from your writings that his descendants are still in the ministry.

I have walked through the Tahlequah home of former Chief John Ross, now called after the married name of his youngest daughter, I have touched the marker that stands at the end of the Trail, and I have read aged and yellow copies of the Cherokee Phoenix that are preserved at the Cherokee Heritage Center. But the details you provided in your history made the past personal. You connected my history with my present and made it real.

My people have a saying - 'Remember the past. The past is what brought you here.' As you compiled it, your history truly is a biography. Mine.

Jennifer Williams

Jennifer

I want to thank you personally for taking the time to write, and for writing such a beautiful letter. In my six years of writing for and publishing About North Georgia I have never received a letter as well-written and thoughtful as yours.

Randy Golden


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