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Sugar Act; Stamp Act
About North Georgia

Around Savannah a planter class had taken root and grew with the success of their cotton and rice crops. These elitist planters derogatorily called the farmer class in North Georgia "crackers" because their wheat and corn crops had to be "cracked" (milled) prior to consumption. The tall coastal pines yielded lumber, which became a major export by the 1760's. One large consumer was the shipbuilding industries in the Caribbean Islands, whose sugar exports help pay for the lumber. When the Sugar Act was passed in 1764 Georgians appeared concerned not so much with the tax, but with the sale of lumber to a major customer.

Stamp Act Stamp
The Stamp Act of 1765 brought the first true rift between loyalist and colonist in Georgia. England saw the colonies as a part of the mother country, populated by Englishmen, and Parliament serves all Englishmen, not just those in England. Colonists saw a mother country out of control. Heady from the defeat of the Spanish and French, and recognized as the pre-eminent world power, the colonists see an England that begins to extract more from the colonies abroad and less from English at home. And the fact that the colonists, as loyal Englishmen, no longer enjoyed the privilege of electing members of Parliament does not sit well with many men. Most colonists and many others around the world saw King George III as incapable.

The arrival of the Speedwell in December, 1765, gave Georgia a choice. The ship carried the stamps that were to be affixed to many things purchased by Georgians. Other colonies, especially South Carolina, made it clear that the stamps should be left on the ship. Georgians were not organized enough to block the unloading and the stamps made it to the royal warehouse where James Wright posted a guard of 40 men.

More on The Sugar Act and the Stamp Act

Next: Liberty Boys; Virginia Resolves

Introduction to the American Revolution in Georgia
Acts of War
End of the French and Indian War
Sugar Act; Stamp Act
Liberty Boys; Virginia Resolves
Radical Georgia Unites
Tea Act and Tea Party
Movement towards Independence
Battle of the Rice Boats
On to Independence
Declaration of Independence
Problems in East Florida
British Take Savannah and Augusta
Battle of Kettle Creek
Battle of Brier Creek
Battle of Savannah
Dark days for Georgia
End of the Revolution
Chronology of Georgia events


American Revolution In Georgia
Georgia's role in the American Revolution

Article Links
Acts of War
Battle of Brier Creek
Battle of Kettle Creek
Battle of Savannah
Battle of the Rice Boats
British Take Savannah and Augusta
Dark days for Georgia
Declaration of Independence
End of the French and Indian War
End of the Revolution
Introduction to the American Revolution in Georgia
Liberty Boys; Virginia Resolves
Movement towards Independence
On to Independence
Problems in East Florida
Radical Georgia Unites
Sugar Act; Stamp Act
Tea Act and Tea Party

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