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Movement towards Independence
About North Georgia

One of the first steps of the colonies in the movement towards independence was to organize communication within the radical organization through "Committees of Correspondence." The first committee was organized in Massachusetts(1772), then Virginia (March, 1773). At this time Georgia was not radical enough to form one of these committee, but the leaders of the movement were kept in communication with the others thanks to the Committee of Correspondence in South Carolina. After the Boston Tea Party in 1773 these Committees became an important means of communication, especially for radicals in Georgia who had extremely limited resources for information.

In 1774 the Georgia House of Commons passed a number of resolutions about the relation of England and the colonies in general. In spite of the prior political problems, when the First Continental Congress was convened no one from Georgia attended, for no one is appointed by the House. The Midway district did appoint Lyman Hall as its representative, but he did not attend, feeling that he could not represent the entire state.

Even well into 1775 many Georgians did not agree with the cause and were alienated by Northern radicals who appeared to be dragging the young colonies into revolution. It was a war that by all contemporary analysis the colonies are doomed to lose since England defeated France and Spain just over a decade earlier. Still, open revolt against England was brewing. Patriots in Charles Town, South Carolina, essentially blocked Georgia's royal governor's communication with England. They opened Governor James Wright's letters and replaced them with forgeries. The political tension rose to new heights when word of the battles at Lexington and Concord reached Savannah.

Most of the actions taken by England were aimed at the populous northern colonies. Since the colonies were not yet a cohesive unit, these actions, for the most part, did not affect the state of Georgia. However, when Lyman Hall attended the Second Continental Congress in May, 1775, he brought money and supplies with him to aid the rebellion. He is also surprised by the unexpected radicalism of the Congress.

Battle of Bunker HillGeorgians, though, considered themselves Americans, and the problems in the North only served to highlight the differences between Americans and the English. Many Georgia moderates were influenced by the Olive Branch Petition, which the Second Continental Congress sent to George III in 1775. The king refuses to see the messenger carrying the petition. Rebellion, it seems, is the only answer.

Georgia began its road to Revolution by creating a new government, similar to those in colonies further north. It features a Council of Safety, to respond to situations that occur when the ruling body, the House, is not in session. Only the most trusted leaders of the Rebellion are appointed to this committee, and although the institutionalization of this state government is still two years away, this marks the start of the Revolution in Georgia. It is shortly after New Year's Day in 1776 that the war moves to Georgia.

More on Georgia and the Continental Congress

Next: Battle of the Rice Boats


Introduction to the American Revolution in Georgia
Acts of War
End of the French and Indian War
Sugar Act; Stamp Act
Liberty Boys; Virginia Resolves
Radical Georgia Unites
Tea Act and Tea Party
Movement towards Independence
Battle of the Rice Boats
On to Independence
Declaration of Independence
Problems in East Florida
British Take Savannah and Augusta
Battle of Kettle Creek
Battle of Brier Creek
Battle of Savannah
Dark days for Georgia
End of the Revolution
Chronology of Georgia events


American Revolution In Georgia
Georgia's role in the American Revolution

Article Links
Acts of War
Battle of Brier Creek
Battle of Kettle Creek
Battle of Savannah
Battle of the Rice Boats
Boston Tea Party
British Take Savannah and Augusta
Dark days for Georgia
Declaration of Independence
End of the French and Indian War
End of the Revolution
Introduction to the American Revolution in Georgia
Liberty Boys; Virginia Resolves
Lyman Hall
Movement towards Independence
On to Independence
Problems in East Florida
Radical Georgia Unites
Second Continental Congress
Sugar Act; Stamp Act
Tea Act and Tea Party

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