About North Georgia
60 Hikes within 60 Miles Atlanta
More from About North Georgia on Facebook (no account required)






Search
Adventure
Attractions
Biographies
Books
Businesses
Cherokee
Christmas
Civil War
Counties
Creek
Events
Facts
Features
Food
Giving Back
Helen
History
Indians
Letters
Lodging
Moundbuilders
Mountains
Naturally
Notes
Parks
Past Issues
Photography
Poetry
Railroads
Revolution
Rivers
Roads
Stops
Tenn
Travel
Voices
Weather
Website

Georgia's Trail of Tears
About North Georgia

Why do you call The Trail of Tears a uniquely Georgian event? I thought tribes throughout the U.S. went on the Trail of Tears.

Anne Pierce

Anne

The Trail of Tears was a specific trail along which American Indians from the Cherokee Nation traveled to Oklahoma. The exact Trail of Tears ran from Rattlesnake Spring, Tennessee (in the vicinity of the Cherokee Agency), northwest to Hopkinsville, Kentucky, and on to the mouth of the Cumberland River, where it crossed the Ohio River. From here it headed to Green's Ferry, where the Cherokee camped until they were able to cross the Mississippi into Missouri. At the time Green's Ferry was about two miles south of Cape Giradeau, Missouri. From here the Trail headed west to Fort Smith, Arkansas, where the U. S. Army processed the Cherokee and sent them into what would eventually become Oklahoma.

Today many American Indians refer to their tribe's "Trail of Tears," but the idiom is Cherokee and technically only refers to the Cherokee Removal.

As for calling the Trail of Tears "uniquely Georgian," you must have seen one of our publisher's presentations since we don't use the phrase on the About North Georgia web site, so we asked him to explain:

I started using this term about a year and a half ago, after the Washington Post referred to the North Carolina Trail of Tears. At the time of the Trail of Tears a majority of the Cherokee lived in Georgia and most of the remaining land claimed by the Cherokee was in present-day Georgia. While some of the Cherokee who were rounded up did live in the hills of North Carolina, it was Georgia that instigated the entire matter. The state of Georgia passed the laws that made it illegal for whites to work in the Cherokee Nation without a permit from the state. It was Georgia who sent the Georgia Guard to oversee the brutalization of the Cherokee from 1830 on. And it was Georgia who ignored the Supreme Court ruling that recognized the Cherokee Nation as sovereign.


Cherokee Indians
Explore the life of the Cherokee Indians in their "Enchanted Land"
Letters


Article Links
Cherokee Nation

About North Georgia
About North Georgia Index
Tools
Add link from your web site to Georgia's Trail of Tears

 

Georgia Imix icon

| More
All of the photographs, graphics and text on About North Georgia (http://www.aboutnorthgeorgia.com) are © Copyright 1994-2017 by Golden Ink unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. For more information please see our Copyright policy


[About North Georgia] [History] [Travel] [Adventure]
[American Indians] [Biography] [Parks ] [Attractions ] [Naturally] [Weather] [Railroads] [Rivers]
[Mountains] [Roads] [Feature Articles] [Previous Issues] [Facts] [Food]
[Giving Back] [Voices from the Past] [Poetry Corner] [Photography]
[Lodging] [About Us] [Bookstore ] [Events ] [Events by month ] [Letters ] [Help ] [Kudos ] [Randy's Corner]
Other Places: Today in Georgia History : Today in The Civil War : Georgia Attractions : Georgia Hiking : Chattanooga



Golden Ink Internet Solutions
Georgia's innovative design group

Legal Notice
Copyright Policy
Privacy Policy