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End of the Revolution
About North Georgia

It takes the external stimulus of Continental General Nathanial Greene to start a movement towards freedom in Georgia. The Continental commander decides to mount a weak offensive in Georgia. The following May, however, Elijah Clark returned with a larger force of his upcountry farmers and support in the form of Andrew Pickens and Lighthorse Harry Lee, a Continental commander who specialized in cavalry operations. Within days, Clark freed the city of Augusta from the British influence, and Colonel Grierson was killed.

A state government is quickly formed, with Augusta the new capitol. With the upcountry free of the British a limited number of troops are raised from the "crackers."

Anthony Wayne
"Mad" Anthony Wayne, whose legendary prowess leads to the capture of the British fort at Stoney Point in 1779 is put in charge of Georgia operations shortly after the victory at Yorktown. Now the British stronghold in Savannah is the target of the combined Continental forces and the Georgia militia. Although outnumbered 2-1, Wayne advances on the town, which the British evacuate. Officially, Lt. Col. James Jackson accepts the surrender of the city. In six months Wayne eliminates the British presence in the state, never once having numerically superior forces. Because of his success the Georgia legislature would grant him a plantation in the state, which he is later forced to sell because of financial problems. Often overlooked, Wayne's campaign is brilliant both strategically and tactically.

Introduction to the American Revolution in Georgia
Acts of War
End of the French and Indian War
Sugar Act; Stamp Act
Liberty Boys; Virginia Resolves
Radical Georgia Unites
Tea Act and Tea Party
Movement towards Independence
Battle of the Rice Boats
On to Independence
Declaration of Independence
Problems in East Florida
British Take Savannah and Augusta
Battle of Kettle Creek
Battle of Brier Creek
Battle of Savannah
Dark days for Georgia
End of the Revolution
Chronology of Georgia events
In depth review of the Liberation of Georgia during the Revolutionary War


American Revolution In Georgia
Georgia's role in the American Revolution

Article Links
Acts of War
Battle of Brier Creek
Battle of Kettle Creek
Battle of Savannah
Battle of the Rice Boats
British Take Savannah and Augusta
Dark days for Georgia
Declaration of Independence
End of the French and Indian War
End of the Revolution
Introduction to the American Revolution in Georgia
Liberty Boys; Virginia Resolves
Movement towards Independence
On to Independence
Problems in East Florida
Radical Georgia Unites
Sugar Act; Stamp Act
Tea Act and Tea Party

About North Georgia
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