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End of the French and Indian War
About North Georgia

Americans, backed by seasoned British troops, won the French and Indian War in 1763.
The high cost of fighting in America and abroad, where the conflict is known as The Seven Years War, changed the way Parliament and King George III viewed the colonies. The British now expected the burgeoning colonies to pay their own way. Colonists expect the British Army to disband, but George has other ideas. He intended to maintain, at the colonists expense, the largest standing peacetime army in the world.

Proclamation of 1763
The King issued the Proclamation of 1763, limiting western expansion of the colonies to an arbitrary line at the height of the Blue Ridge Mountains. At first the new expanse of land was just what the Georgia settlers wanted, but by 1775 the boundary seemed restrictive.

When the Creeks met with English Indian Agent John Stuart in Augusta in 1763, he recommended a solution to the problem the Creeks were having with squatters on their land including some in present-day eastern North Georgia -- sell the land to the colony. Although estimates of the number of squatters vary widely, there were probably less than 500 in the North Georgia section of this cession. In the years following the French and Indian War this portion of the frontier, which fell within the line created by King George III's Proclamation was slowly settled. The area would be considered lightly populated by the start of the American Revolution. Most families lived on subsistence farms, growing their own food and selling a small portion to meet other needs.

Next:Sugar Act; Stamp Act

The American Revolution in Georgia
Acts of War
End of the French and Indian War
Sugar Act; Stamp Act
Liberty Boys; Virginia Resolves
Radical Georgia Unites
Tea Act and Tea Party
Movement towards Independence
Battle of the Rice Boats
On to Independence
Declaration of Independence
Problems in East Florida
Battle of Kettle Creek
Battle of Briar (Brier) Creek
Savannah, Georgia falls under British control
Battle of Savannah, Georgia
Dark days for Georgia
Mad Anthony Wayne frees the state of Georgia from British control
Chronology of Georgia events
Over the next 7 years the British passed a Acts of War to tax the colonies. These acts did little besides inflaming the colonists to action.


American Revolution In Georgia
Georgia's role in the American Revolution

Article Links
Acts of War
Battle of Kettle Creek
Battle of the Rice Boats
Declaration of Independence
End of the French and Indian War
Liberty Boys; Virginia Resolves
Movement towards Independence
On to Independence
Problems in East Florida
Radical Georgia Unites
Sugar Act; Stamp Act
Tea Act and Tea Party
The American Revolution in Georgia

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